It’s Monday, What Are You Reading? #6

It's Monday! What Are You Reading

This blog meme is hosted by Book Date. It is a place to meet up and share what you have been, are and about to be reading over the week.  It’s a great post to organize yourself. It’s an opportunity to visit and comment, and er… add to that ever growing TBR pile!

What I just finished:

 

Yesterday I finished The Divine Heart for my stop in the blog tour with YA Bound Book Tours. This is a really great book.

What I’m currently reading:

 

I just started The Upside of Unrequited. I’m so excited to finally read this one!

What I’m reading next:

 

Next I will be reading So Near The Horizon for a blog tour with YA Bound Book Tours.

What are you guys reading this week? Have you read any of these books? Let me know in the comments!

Review: 101 Video Games to Play Before You Grow Up


Title: 101 Video Games to Play Before You Grow Up
Author: Ben Bertoli
Genre: Children’s
Publisher: Walter Foster Jr
Source: NetGalley
Release Date: October 1, 2017
Rating: ★★★★

Goodreads Synopsis:

Have you got game? 101 Video Games to Play Before You Grow Up is the unofficial, definitive guide for the best video games ever made!

Each page in this interactive handbook offers behind-the-scenes tidbits and trivia about the games that belong on your bucket list, along with parental rating guidelines, series background information, and storyline previews. Gamers can record their personal ratings of each series as they play their way through the list, making notes and critiquing the best and worst parts of each game.

All different types of video games are featured, including adventure, puzzle, platform, racing, and role-playing games. Both gaming newbies and more experienced players can learn tips and tricks about the best games out there, and discover new genres of games to explore next.

No matter what gaming system you have, this handy guide will help parents and kids alike choose the next best game to play.

Review:

This is a great book for kids who love video games.

There are so many games listed! Each game listing is very detailed. It made me want to play all of the games I haven’t played before.

What I like is that there is a space at the bottom of the page for kids to fill in their rating of the game and their thoughts on it. This gets kids to think critically about the games their playing. I used to learn so much from video games when I was a kid. They can be a great teaching tool.

There are fun facts about the creation of the game for each listing which are interesting to read.

I loved reminiscing about these games while reading this book. So many of these games filled my childhood, and are still relevant today, such as Mario and Sonic. I think you would even enjoy these games if you are already grown up!

Weekly Wrap Up #6

Here’s my weekly wrap up!

I read 6 books this week, and reviewed all of them:

My favourites were A Darker Shade of Magic and They Both Die at the End.

I also did a weekly book meme everyday:

What did you read this week? Have you read any of these books?

Review: The Trick

Title: The Trick
Author: Emanuel Bergmann
Genre: Fiction
Publisher: Atria Books
Source: Goodreads Giveaway
Release Date: September 19, 2017
Rating: ★★★★★

Goodreads Synopsis:

Sweeping between Prague during World War II and modern day Los Angeles, this deeply moving debut follows a young Jewish man in 1934 who falls in love and joins the circus as the country descends into war. Decades later, a young boy seeks out the now cynical, elderly magician in the hopes that his spells might keep his family together.

Prague, 1934: The fifteen-year-old rabbi s son Moshe Goldenhirsch marvels at the legendary circus magician known as the Half-Moon Man. Unexpectedly, he falls madly in love with the magician’s delightful assistant, spurring him to run away from home to join the circus, which is slowly making its way to Germany as war looms on the horizon. Soon, he becomes a world-renowned magician known as the Great Zabbatini, even sought after by Adolf Hitler. But when Moshe is discovered to be a Jew, only his special talent can save him from perishing in a concentration camp.

Los Angeles, 2007: Ten-year-old Max Cohn is convinced that magic can bring his estranged parents back together before they divorce. So one night he climbs out of his bedroom window in search of the Great Zabbatini, certain this powerful magician has the power to reunite his family.

Review:

I was pleasantly surprised by this book. It isn’t something that I would typically read but I loved it. 

This story was so easy to read. It had good pacing throughout. The chapters alternated between Moshe in the 1930s onward, and Max in 2007. By the end of each chapter, I wanted more, so I had to keep reading. 

There were many surprising twists through the story, in both time periods. They were both dramatic and funny. 

I loved the way that the two stories came together at the end. They are connected in a beautiful way. I won’t give it away, you’ll have to read it for yourself!

I recommend this story if you’re looking for a heartwarming read! 

Stacking The Shelves #5

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This is a weekly meme hosted by Tynga’s Reviews and Reading Reality. Stacking The Shelves is all about sharing the books you are adding to your shelves, may it be physical or virtual. This means you can include books you buy in physical store or online, books you borrow from friends or the library, review books, gifts and of course ebooks!

On Sunday I went to Word On The Street, a book festival in Toronto.

It was blazing hot! And it’s all outdoors. Even though it was on the lake, there wasn’t any relief.

So of course, I splurged a little on books… okay I splurged a lot. Here’s what I bought:

From HarperCollins I bought:

  • This Savage Song by Victoria Schwab
  • Our Dark Night by Victoria Schwab
  • They Both Die at the End by Adam Silvera
  • King’s Cage by Victoria Aveyard
  • One Dark Throne by Kendare Blake
  • Bad Feminist by Roxanne Gay
  • Hunger by Roxanne Gay

From Simon and Schuster I bought:

  • Scrappy Little Nobody by Anna Kendrick
  • The Girl With The Lower Back Tattoo by Amy Schemer

So after that I had to stop. Those books were heavy enough to carry back to the car.

I had a pretty good book week. Now I really have to take a break from buying books (but we’ll see if that happens!)

What books did you buy this week? Have you read any of these ones?

Review: DC Super Hero Girls, Volume 4: Past Times at Super Hero High


Title: DC Super Hero Girls: Past Times at Super Hero High
Author: Shea Fontana
Genre: Middle Grade
Publisher: DC Entertainment
Source: NetGalley
Release Date: September 26, 2017
Rating: ★★★★

Goodreads Synopsis:

Welcome back to DC Super Hero High!
In the newest original graphic novel from the DC Super Hero Girls line, catch up with the students of Super Hero High School as they find out that fun, friendship and hard work are all parts of growing up! DC SUPER HERO GIRLS VOL. 4 continues to develop the relationships forged in DC SUPER HERO GIRLS: FINALS CRISIS and HITS AND MYTHS. Written by Shea Fontana, this story is perfect for girls 6-12.

Review:

This is the first DC Super Hero Girls comic I’ve read. It was super cute!

I loved how all the super heroes are kids in this series! Young readers can fall in love with these classic super heroes. It’s especially important that it focuses on the female super heroes, such as Wonder Woman and Batgirl, since most super hero entertainment is aimed towards a male audience.

These stories also translate the characters into appropriate storylines for kids. I love Harley Quinn but her graphic novels are definitely not appropriate for children. However, the same characters are in this graphic novel without losing any of their personality. For example, Harley is able to charm dogs and she calls the baby dinosaur her “puddin’.”

I really liked this graphic novel and would definitely recommend it for middle grade readers.

First Lines Friday #5

This is a weekly meme hosted by Wandering Words, where you give the first few lines of a book to hook your readers before introducing the book.

Here are my first lines:

“Blue Sargent had forgotten how many times she’d been told that she would kill her true love.
Her family traded in predictions. These predictions tended, however, to run toward the nonspecific. Things like: Something terrible will happen to you today. It might involve the number six. Or: Money is coming. Open your hand for it. Or: You have a big decision and it will not make itself.

Do you recognize these first lines?

And the book is… The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater.

 

Here’s the Goodreads synopsis:

It is freezing in the churchyard, even before the dead arrive.

Every year, Blue Sargent stands next to her clairvoyant mother as the soon-to-be dead walk past. Blue herself never sees them—not until this year, when a boy emerges from the dark and speaks directly to her.

His name is Gansey, and Blue soon discovers that he is a rich student at Aglionby, the local private school. Blue has a policy of staying away from Aglionby boys. Known as Raven Boys, they can only mean trouble.

But Blue is drawn to Gansey, in a way she can’t entirely explain. He has it all—family money, good looks, devoted friends—but he’s looking for much more than that. He is on a quest that has encompassed three other Raven Boys: Adam, the scholarship student who resents all the privilege around him; Ronan, the fierce soul who ranges from anger to despair; and Noah, the taciturn watcher of the four, who notices many things but says very little.

For as long as she can remember, Blue has been warned that she will cause her true love to die. She never thought this would be a problem. But now, as her life becomes caught up in the strange and sinister world of the Raven Boys, she’s not so sure anymore.

I love this series! Have you read it?