Review: The Daughter’s Tale

I loved this story. It was fast paced, with short chapters, so it was a quick read for me.

Title: The Daughter’s Tale
Author: Armando Lucas Correa
Genre: Historical Fiction
Publisher: Simon and Schuster Canada
Source: Publisher via NetGalley
Format: Ebook
Release Date: May 7, 2019
Rating: ★★★★★

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Goodreads Synopsis:

The internationally bestselling author of The German Girldelivers an unforgettable family saga of love and redemption during World War II, based on the true story of the Nazi massacre of a French village in 1944.

New York City, 2015: Elise Duval, eighty years old, receives a phone call from a woman recently arrived from Cuba bearing messages from a time and country that she’s long forgotten. A French Catholic who arrived in New York after World War II, Elise and her world are forever changed when the woman arrives with letters written to Elise from her mother in German during the war, unravelling more than seven decades of secrets.

Berlin, 1939: Bookstore owner and recent widow Amanda Sternberg is fleeing Nazi Germany with her two young daughters, heading towards unoccupied France. She arrives in Haute-Vienne with only one of her girls. Their freedom is short-lived and soon they are taken to a labor camp.

Based on true events, The Daughter’s Tale chronicles one of the most harrowing atrocities perpetrated by the Nazis during World War II: the 1944 massacre of all the inhabitants of Oradour-Sur-Glane, a small, idyllic village in the south of France. Heartbreaking and immersive, The Daughter’s Tale is a beautifully crafted family saga of love, survival, and hope against all odds.

Review:

I loved this story. It was fast paced, with short chapters, so it was a quick read for me. 

The story was mostly set during World War II. The beginning and the end were in 2015, which looked at the main character in her later life. The first chapter didn’t really make sense until about halfway through the book. There was so much that happened, so it was always exciting. 

The concept of family was fluid in this story. Depending on the situation they had to call different people family. For example, parents had to give up their children to give them a better life, with the strong possibility of never seeing them again. This sometimes meant giving them to friends or even strangers, and hoping that they would be looked after. It was heartbreaking to see families being separated like that, but it was necessary for their survival. 

This was a powerful story! I highly recommend it. 

What to read next:

The German Girl by Armando Lucas Correa

Have you read The Daughter’s Tale? What did you think of it?

Top Ten Tuesday – Best Harry Potter Quotes

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish and it is now hosted by The Artsy Reader Girl. This week’s theme is Inspirational Book Quotes, but I changed it to Best Harry Potter Quotes. Here’s my list:

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish and it is now hosted by The Artsy Reader Girl. This week’s theme is Inspirational Book Quotes, but I changed it to Best Harry Potter Quotes. Here’s my list:

1. “We could all have been killed – or worse, expelled.” – Hermione Granger, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone

2. “It takes a great deal of bravery to stand up to our enemies, but just as much to stand up to our friends.” – Albus Dumbledore, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone

3. “But you know, happiness can be found even in the darkest of times, if one only remembers to turn on the light.” – Albus Dumbledore, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

4. “It matters not what someone is born, but what they grow up to be.” – Albus Dumbledore, Harry Potter and Goblet of Fire

5. “Things we lose have a way of coming back to us in the end, if not always in the way we expect.” – Luna Lovegood, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

6. “It does not do well to dwell on dreams and forget to live.” – Albus Dumbledore, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone

7. “Just because you have the emotional range of a teaspoon doesn’t mean we all have.” – Hermione Granger, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

8. “After all this time?” “Always.” – Albus Dumbledore and Severus Snape, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

9. “Of course it is happening inside your head, Harry, but why on earth should that mean that it is not real?” – Albus Dumbledore, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

10. “All was well.” – Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

Review: King of Fools (The Shadow Game #2)

This sequel to Ace of Shades was fast paced and intense. There were many new characters as well as new subplots.

Title: King of Fools (The Shadow Game #2)
Author: Amanda Foody
Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy
Publisher: Inkyard Press
Source: Publisher via NetGalley
Format: Ebook
Release Date: April 30, 2019
Rating: ★★★★★

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Goodreads Synopsis:

Indulge your vices in the City of Sin, where a sinister street war is brewing and fame is the deadliest killer of them all…

On the quest to find her missing mother, prim and proper Enne Salta became reluctant allies with Levi Glaisyer, the city’s most famous con man. Saving his life in the Shadow Game forced Enne to assume the identity of Seance, a mysterious underworld figure. Now, with the Chancellor of the Republic dead and bounties on both their heads, she and Levi must play a dangerous game of crime and politics…with the very fate of New Reynes at stake.

Thirsting for his freedom and the chance to build an empire, Levi enters an unlikely partnership with Vianca Augustine’s estranged son. Meanwhile, Enne remains trapped by the mafia donna’s binding oath, playing the roles of both darling lady and cunning street lord, unsure which side of herself reflects the truth.

As Enne and Levi walk a path of unimaginable wealth and opportunity, new relationships and deadly secrets could quickly lead them into ruin. And when unforeseen players enter the game, they must each make an impossible choice: To sacrifice everything they’ve earned in order to survive…

Or die as legends.

Review:

This sequel to Ace of Shades was fast paced and intense. There were many new characters as well as new subplots.

This story added a political scene to New Reynes, on top of the many gangs. It was another layer to the story, where the politicians were competing for their seat alongside the gang fights.

There were so many new characters and relationships that it was difficult to keep track of sometimes. Everyone seemed to think one way but act another, so you couldn’t really tell who was being honest. Each person also has a talent, which sometimes had to be kept a secret. It was a little confusing at times, but I had figured it out by the end.

The ending of the book dropped a bunch of bombshells. Even when I thought it was over, there were still more revelations to come. I’m curious to see what happens next.

Thank you Inkyard Press for providing a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

What to read next:

Daughter of the Burning City by Amanda Foody

Six of Crows (Six of Crows #1) by Leigh Bardugo

Have you read King of Fools? What did you think of it?

It’s Monday, What Are You Reading? – April 29

This blog meme is hosted by Book Date. It is a place to meet up and share what you have been, are and about to be reading over the week. It’s a great post to organize yourself. It’s an opportunity to visit and comment, and er… add to that ever growing TBR pile!

This blog meme is hosted by Book Date. It is a place to meet up and share what you have been, are and about to be reading over the week.  It’s a great post to organize yourself. It’s an opportunity to visit and comment, and er… add to that ever growing TBR pile!

What I just finished:

This weekend I finished The Daughter’s Tale by Armando Lucas Correa.

What I’m currently reading:

I’m currently reading Mya’s Strategy to Save the World by Tanya Lloyd Kyi.

What I’m reading next:

Next I will be reading Nocturna by Maya Motayne.

What are you guys reading this week? Have you read any of these books?

Review: Kristy’s Big Day (Baby-Sitters Club Graphic Novels #6)

It wasn’t until I started reading this book that I realized I’ve never read the original story. I knew that Kristy’s mother got remarried, but I didn’t know the story behind the wedding.

Title: Kristy’s Big Day (Baby-Sitters Club Graphic Novels #6)
Author: Gale Galligan, Ann M. Martin
Genre: Young Adult, Graphic Novel
Publisher: Graphic
Source: Library
Format: Ebook
Release Date: August 28, 2018
Rating: ★★★★★

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Goodreads Synopsis:

Kristy’s mom is getting married, and Kristy is going to be a bridesmaid! The only trouble is, fourteen kids are coming in town for the wedding. Kristy, Claudia, Mary Anne, Stacey, Dawn, and Mallory think they can handle it, but that’s before they spend a week changing diapers, stopping arguments, solving mix-ups, and planning activities. It’s the biggest job the BSC has ever had, but they’ll work together to make sure Kristy’s big day is a success!

Review:

It wasn’t until I started reading this book that I realized I’ve never read the original story. I knew that Kristy’s mother got remarried, but I didn’t know the story behind the wedding.

I was always fascinated with Watson’s house when I was a kid, so it was so cool to finally see it again in the images. His house has enough rooms for all 6 kids to have their own bedroom, even when they have to split their time between their other parents. There is also a ghost that lives in the attic, as well as multiple pets. This always seemed like a fun and huge house to live in!

One thing I love about this series is that it discusses real issues that kids have to deal with, while also maintaining their friend group. These include dealing with difficult siblings, medical issues, and moving to a new house. In this story, Kristy’s family is combining with her new stepfather’s family and she is moving to his new house which is across town. 

I loved this graphic novel! I’m excited to see the series continue.

What to read next:

Kristy’s Big Day (The Baby-Sitters Club #6) by Ann M. Martin

Best Babysitters Ever by Caroline Cala

Have you read Kristy’s Big Day? What did you think of it?

Jill’s Weekly Wrap-Up – April 28

Here’s my weekly wrap-up!

Here are my reviews for the week with my ratings:

I did 9 weekly blogging memes:

How was your week? What did you guys read?

Sundays in Bed With… The Daughter’s Tale

This Sunday I’m reading The Daughter’s Tale by Armando Lucas Correa.

The meme that dares to ask what book has been in your bed this morning? Come share what book you’ve spent time curled up reading in bed, or which book you wish you had time to read today! This meme is hosted by Midnight Book Girl.

This Sunday I’m reading The Daughter’s Tale by Armando Lucas Correa.

Goodreads Synopsis:

From the internationally bestselling author of The German Girl, an unforgettable family saga exploring a hidden piece of World War II history and the lengths a mother will go to protect her children—perfect for fans of Lilac GirlsWe Were the Lucky Ones, and The Alice Network.

BERLIN, 1939. The dreams that Amanda Sternberg and her husband, Julius, had for their daughters are shattered when the Nazis descend on Berlin, burning down their beloved family bookshop and sending Julius to a concentration camp. Desperate to save her children, Amanda flees toward the south of France, where the widow of an old friend of her husband’s has agreed to take her in. Along the way, a refugee ship headed for Cuba offers another chance at escape and there, at the dock, Amanda is forced to make an impossible choice that will haunt her for the rest of her life. Once in Haute-Vienne, her brief respite is inter­rupted by the arrival of Nazi forces, and Amanda finds herself in a labor camp where she must once again make a heroic sacrifice.

NEW YORK, 2015. Eighty-year-old Elise Duval receives a call from a woman bearing messages from a time and country that she forced herself to forget. A French Catholic who arrived in New York after World War II, Elise is shocked to discover that the letters were from her mother, written in German during the war. Despite Elise’s best efforts to stave off her past, seven decades of secrets begin to unravel.

Based on true events, The Daughter’s Tale chronicles one of the most harrowing atrocities perpetrated by the Nazis during the war. Heart­breaking and immersive, it is a beautifully crafted family saga of love, survival, and redemption.

What book are you in bed with today?