Review: Faith: Taking Flight (Faith Herbert Origin Story #1)

Title: Faith: Taking Flight (Faith Herbert Origin Story #1)
Author: Julie Murphy
Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy, LGBT
Publisher: Balzer + Bray
Source: Library
Format: Ebook
Release Date: July 7, 2020
Rating: ★★★★

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Goodreads Synopsis:

From Julie Murphy, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Dumplin’, comes the first in a two-book origin story of Faith, a groundbreaking, plus-sized superhero from the Valiant Entertainment comics.

Faith Herbert is a pretty regular teen. When she’s not hanging out with her two best friends, Matt and Ches, she’s volunteering at the local animal shelter or obsessing over the long-running teen drama The Grove.

So far, her senior year has been spent trying to sort out her feelings for her maybe-crush Johnny and making plans to stay close to Grandma Lou after graduation. Of course, there’s also that small matter of recently discovering she can fly….

When the fictional world of The Grove crashes into Faith’s reality as the show relocates to her town, she can’t believe it when TV heroine Dakota Ash takes a romantic interest in her.

But her fandom-fueled daydreams aren’t enough to distract Faith from the fact that first animals, then people, have begun to vanish from the town. Only Faith seems able to connect the dots to a new designer drug infiltrating her high school.

But when her investigation puts the people she loves in danger, she will have to confront her hidden past and use her newfound gifts—risking everything to save her friends and beloved town.

Review:

Faith Herbert is an orphaned teenager who lives with her grandmother and works at an animal shelter. She also has a superpower: she can fly. One day, the cast of Faith’s favourite TV show, The Grove, moves to her hometown in Minnesota to film their series. Faith meets her dream crush and star of the show, Dakota Ash, and they instantly connect. At the animal shelter, dogs start going missing and coming in with mysterious illnesses. Then, people start to disappear too. At the same time, there is a new drug that is being distributed among students at schools. Faith is the only one who sees the connections between all of these events in her town, so it’s up to her to save everyone.

Faith is a wonderful, honest superhero. She doesn’t have the stereotypical look of a superhero, which is usually slim and muscular. Faith proudly displays her fat body. She is also discovering her romantic preferences. Faith doesn’t know if she likes boys or girls, but her friends are eager to support her no matter what.

The prologue for this book was very exciting and engaging. In the prologue, Faith was sent to a special camp where she could figure out if she had superpowers. However, after the prologue, the story didn’t mention her superpowers or what happened at the camp for a few chapters. I wanted to know more about what happened there. There seemed to be a lot of mystery surrounding it, since she went right back to her normal life after. I wish the superhero action had continued from the prologue into the beginning of the story.

This was a fun, modern superhero story!

What to read next:

Dumplin’ by Julie Murphy

In the Role of Brie Hutchens by Nicole Melleby

Have you read Faith: Taking Flight? What did you think of it?

Review: A Court of Thorns and Roses (A Court of Thorns and Roses #1)

Title: A Court of Thorns and Roses (A Court of Thorns and Roses #1)
Author: Sarah J. Maas
Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy
Publisher: Bloomsbury
Source: Purchased
Format: Hardcover
Release Date: May 5, 2015
Rating: ★★★★★

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Goodreads Synopsis:

Feyre’s survival rests upon her ability to hunt and kill – the forest where she lives is a cold, bleak place in the long winter months. So when she spots a deer in the forest being pursued by a wolf, she cannot resist fighting it for the flesh. But to do so, she must kill the predator and killing something so precious comes at a price …

Dragged to a magical kingdom for the murder of a faerie, Feyre discovers that her captor, his face obscured by a jewelled mask, is hiding far more than his piercing green eyes would suggest. Feyre’s presence at the court is closely guarded, and as she begins to learn why, her feelings for him turn from hostility to passion and the faerie lands become an even more dangerous place. Feyre must fight to break an ancient curse, or she will lose him forever.

Review:

Feyre hunts for animals to feed her father and two sisters. When she comes across a wolf one day, she pauses as she wonders if he could be a faerie in disguise. She decides to kill him so that he doesn’t attack her prey. However, a faerie shows up to their home soon after she killed the wolf and tells them that he was a fae in disguise. The faerie, named Tamlin, brings Feyre to his kingdom as her punishment for killing one of his kind. The faerie world is dangerous for a human, but at the same time, Feyre holds the key to saving Tamlin and his kingdom.

This book was definitely worth the hype. I tried to read it during a buddy read a few years ago, but I found it difficult to get into at the beginning. I think the beginning was slow because the characters all seemed very angry and weren’t getting what they wanted. Feyre had to hunt to feed her ungrateful family, and she made the mistake of killing a faerie. Tamlin wasn’t happy to lose his fellow fae and have to punish Feyre for it. Neither of them were happy for a long time, which was discouraging to read. However, the story picked up about a quarter of the way through and was exciting until the end.

One thing that surprised me about this book was how graphic some scenes were. There were some quite violent scenes. There were also descriptive sex scenes. The characters were in their late teens and early twenties so that’s probably why there were more mature themes. The story is classified as young adult but I would suggest it for an older young adult audience.

I’m so glad I finally read this book. I’m excited to read the next one.

What to read next:

A Court of Mist and Fury (A Court of Thorns and Roses #2) by Sarah J. Maas

The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air #1) by Holly Black

Other books in the series:

  • A Court of Mist and Fury
  • A Court of Wings and Ruin
  • A Court of Frost and Starlight

Have you read A Court of Thorns and Roses? What did you think of it?

Review: The Evil Queen (The Forest of Good and Evil #1)

Title: The Evil Queen (The Forest of Good and Evil #1)
Author: Gena Showalter
Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy
Publisher: Inkyard Press
Source: Publisher
Format: Paperback
Release Date: June 25, 2019
Rating: ★★★★★

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Goodreads Synopsis:

WELCOME TO THE FOREST OF GOOD AND EVIL.

A DREAM COME TRUE…AND A LIVING NIGHTMARE.

Far, far away, in the realm of Enchantia, creatures of legend still exist, magic is the norm and fairy tales are real. Except, fairy tales aren’t based on myths and legends of the past—they are prophecies of the future.

Raised in the mortal realm, Everly Morrow has no idea she’s a real-life fairy-tale princess—until she manifests an ability to commune with mirrors.

Look. See… What will one peek hurt?

Soon, a horrifying truth is revealed. She is fated to be Snow White’s greatest enemy, the Evil Queen.

With powers beyond her imagination or control, Everly returns to the land of her birth. There, she meets Roth Charmaine, the supposed Prince Charming. Their attraction is undeniable, but their relationship is doomed. As the prophecy unfolds, Everly faces one betrayal after another, and giving in to her dark side proves more tempting every day. Can she resist, or will she become the queen—and villain—she was born to be?

The battle between good and evil is on.

Review:

Everly Morrow has lived her whole life in the mortal world with her sister and mother. One day, she begins to see something in the mirror, which is her special magical ability. Everly is actually from a fairy tale world, Enchantia, where she is fated to play a role in the fairy tale of Snow White and the Evil Queen. Everly has to travel to Enchantia to fulfill her part in the prophecy, but no one knows which role they are supposed to play. They have to figure out who will be Snow White, Prince Charming, and the Evil Queen.

This was an exciting twist on the fairy tale adaptation. It wasn’t clear which character was playing which role in the Snow White fairy tale. At different parts of the story, any of the characters could be either Snow White, the Huntsman, Prince Charming, or the Evil Queen. This was a clever way to keep the reader guessing until the end.

This story was a little long and complicated at times. It got confusing when the roles in the Snow White kept changing, though it kept me wondering who was going to eventually fulfill each role. Some of the scenes were repetitive, such as when they traveled in the forest. The same things kept happening to the characters in the forest, like being chased by different creatures and bathing in the lake. I think some of these parts could have been condensed to make the story more fast paced.

I really enjoyed this fairy tale story. I’m excited to read the next one!

Thank you HarperCollins Canada for providing a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

What to read next:

Girls Made of Snow and Glass by Melissa Bashardoust

Crown of Coral and Pearl by Mara Rutherford

Other books in the series:

  • The Glass Queen

Have you read The Evil Queen? What did you think of it?

Review: The Barren Grounds (The Misewa Saga #1)

Title: The Barren Grounds (The Misewa Saga #1)
Author: David A. Robertson
Genre: Middle Grade, Fantasy
Publisher: Puffin Canada
Source: Publisher via NetGalley
Format: Ebook
Release Date: September 8, 2020
Rating: ★★★★★

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Goodreads Synopsis:

Narnia meets traditional Indigenous stories of the sky and constellations in an epic middle grade fantasy series from award-winning author David Robertson.

Morgan and Eli, two Indigenous children forced away from their families and communities, are brought together in a foster home in Winnipeg, Manitoba. They each feel disconnected, from their culture and each other, and struggle to fit in at school and at their new home — until they find a secret place, walled off in an unfinished attic bedroom. A portal opens to another reality, Askí, bringing them onto frozen, barren grounds, where they meet Ochek (Fisher). The only hunter supporting his starving community, Misewa, Ochek welcomes the human children, teaching them traditional ways to survive. But as the need for food becomes desperate, they embark on a dangerous mission. Accompanied by Arik, a sassy Squirrel they catch stealing from the trapline, they try to save Misewa before the icy grip of winter freezes everything — including them. 

Review:

Morgan and Eli are Indigenous foster children who live in the same foster house in Winnipeg. Eli has just moved in, and even though Morgan moved in two months before, she doesn’t feel comfortable yet because she hasn’t ever had a comfortable long term home. Their foster parents try to make the children feel more at home by bringing in Indigenous traditions, but it only pushes them away further. One night, Morgan and Eli sneak up to the attic and discover a portal into Misewa, a land with talking animals. Misewa has become barren, with a winter that has lasted years. Morgan and Eli have to help their new friend, Ochek the fisher, bring the green time back to their land while also learning about their Indigenous heritage.

This story reminded me of the Chronicles Narnia, but with Indigenous roots. The land that they travel to has talking animals who walk on two legs and speak Cree. This story had some creative aspects because Morgan is a writer and Eli is an artist. It is through Eli’s drawing that they find the mysterious land. As a writer, I liked how these creative arts connected that world with ours.

Though Morgan is from an Indigenous background, she doesn’t know their traditions. She has been in foster care for as long as she can remember, so she doesn’t feel a connection to her heritage. When her foster parents bring in Indigenous food and moccasins for her to wear in an attempt to get closer to her, it pushes her further away because she doesn’t have that connection to her heritage. This reminded me of the residential schools in Canada. Years ago, Indigenous children were taken from their homes and sent to residential schools to remove their traditions and cultural history. The way that Morgan didn’t know her own background reminded me of that because she had also been removed from her family and heritage. However, this wasn’t quite as devastating for Morgan as it was for the children who were sent to residential schools because she was able to learn some of her Indigenous heritage on their trip to Misewa.

This is a beautiful middle grade story. I can’t wait to read the next one!

Thank you Penguin Random House Canada for providing a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

What to read next:

Sugar Falls: A Residential School Story by David Alexander Robertson, Scott B. Henderson (illustrator)

The Marrow Thieves by Cherie Dimaline

Have you read The Barren Grounds? What did you think of it?

Review: The Lost Queen (The Lost Queen Trilogy #1)

Title: The Lost Queen (The Lost Queen Trilogy #1)
Author: Signe Pike
Genre: Historical Fiction, Fantasy
Publisher: Touchstone
Source: Gifted
Format: Paperback
Release Date: September 4, 2018
Rating: ★★★★★

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Goodreads Synopsis:

Compared to Outlander and The Mists of Avalon, this thrilling first novel of a debut trilogy reveals the untold story of Languoreth—a forgotten queen of sixth-century Scotland—twin sister of the man who inspired the legend of Merlin. 

I write because I have seen the darkness that will come. Already there are those who seek to tell a new history…

In a land of mountains and mist, tradition and superstition, Languoreth and her brother Lailoken are raised in the Old Way of their ancestors. But in Scotland, a new religion is rising, one that brings disruption, bloodshed, and riot. And even as her family faces the burgeoning forces of Christianity, the Anglo-Saxons, bent on colonization, are encroaching from the east. When conflict brings the hero Emrys Pendragon to her father’s door, Languoreth finds love with one of his warriors. Her deep connection to Maelgwn is forged by enchantment, but she is promised in marriage to Rhydderch, son of a Christian king. As Languoreth is catapulted into a world of violence and political intrigue, she must learn to adapt. Together with her brother—a warrior and druid known to history as Myrddin—Languoreth must assume her duty to fight for the preservation of the Old Way and the survival of her kingdom, or risk the loss of them both forever.

Based on new scholarship, this tale of bravery and conflicted love brings a lost queen back to life—rescuing her from obscurity, and reaffirming her place at the center of one of the most enduring legends of all time.

Review:

Langoureth is the forgotten queen from the sixth century. She was raised with her twin brother, Lailoken, in the Old Way, with legends and secrets kept by the Keepers. As they grew up, Christianity grew in popularity and became the religion of the land. When Langoureth is promised to be married to the son of the king, she has to fight between the desire to follow her heart and to do what’s right for her family.

This story was fast paced and exciting. The chapters ended with cliffhangers that made me want to keep reading. Langoureth had many secrets that she had to hide from others, which added tension. If these secrets were revealed, it could mean the death of her or the people she cared most about so it was important that she keep them to herself. The threat of these secrets kept up the tension in the story.

I loved the medieval history in this story. I wasn’t aware of this story before reading this book. There isn’t a lot of information about these historical figures, since it took place 1,500 years ago, but this story of the forgotten queen, Langoureth, is an important one.

This is a great historical story. I’m so excited to read the next book in the trilogy!

What to read next:

The Forgotten Kingdom (The Lost Queen Trilogy #2) by Signe Pike

Finding Merlin by Adam Ardrey

Have you read The Lost Queen? What did you think of it?

Blog Tour Review: Queen of Volts (The Shadow Game #3)

Title: Queen of Volts (The Shadow Game #3)
Author: Amanda Foody
Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy
Publisher: Inkyard Press
Source: Publisher via NetGalley
Format: Ebook
Release Date: September 1, 2020
Rating: ★★★★★

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Goodreads Synopsis:

Return to the City of Sin, where the final game is about to begin…and winning will demand the ultimate sacrifice.

Only days after a corrupt election and brutal street war, one last bloodthirsty game has begun. The players? The twenty-two most powerful, notorious people in New Reynes.

After realizing they have no choice but to play, Enne Scordata and Levi Glaisyer are desperate to forge new alliances and bargain for their safety. But while Levi offers false smiles and an even falser peace to the city’s politicians, Enne must face a world where her true Mizer identity has been revealed…and any misstep could turn deadly.

Meanwhile, a far more dangerous opponent has appeared on the board, one plucked right from the most gruesome legends of New Reynes. As the game takes its final, vicious turn, Levi and Enne must decide once and for all whether to be partners or enemies.

Because in a game for survival, there are only losers…

And monsters.

Review:

Just days after the events of the election in King of Fools, a new shadow game has begun. Each player was given a card with a character on it. Now, the card has another name listed, which is the person’s target. The only way to win the game is to kill your target and take their card. Meanwhile, Levi is struggling with the loss of his friend, while Enne is figuring out her new identity. It doesn’t seem like there will be any way to survive this game.

There was a bit of a recap as the characters were introduced in this story. I was glad, because it has been a while since I read King of Fools. I think this series could be reread multiple times, with the reader noticing more clues each time. Since the events of the books take place over a few months, it would be much easier to keep track of the plot if they were read all at once.

The stakes were the highest yet in this book. The shadow game was literally life or death. It was quite intense, with everyone being a target. Each character’s story was so detailed and carefully plotted. The characters could almost have had a book of their own because there was so much that happened in this story.

This was a great ending to The Shadow Game trilogy!

Thank you Inkyard Press for providing a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

What to read next:

The Last Magician by Lisa Maxwell

The Diviners by Libba Bray

About the author:

Amanda Foody has always considered imagination to be our best attempt at magic. After spending her childhood longing to attend Hogwarts, she now loves to write about immersive settings and characters grappling with insurmountable destinies. She holds a master’s in accountancy from Villanova University and a bachelor of arts in English literature from the College of William and Mary.

Have you read Queen of Volts? What did you think of it?

Blog Tour Review: Where Dreams Descend (Kingdom of Cards #1)

Title: Where Dreams Descend (Kingdom of Cards #1)
Author: Janella Angeles
Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy
Publisher: Wednesday Books
Source: Publisher via NetGalley
Format: Ebook
Release Date: August 25, 2020
Rating: ★★★★★

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Goodreads Synopsis:

In a city covered in ice and ruin, a group of magicians face off in a daring game of magical feats to find the next headliner of the Conquering Circus, only to find themselves under the threat of an unseen danger striking behind the scenes.

As each act becomes more and more risky and the number of missing magicians piles up, three are forced to reckon with their secrets before the darkness comes for them next.

The Star: Kallia, a powerful showgirl out to prove she’s the best no matter the cost

The Master: Jack, the enigmatic keeper of the club, and more than one lie told

The Magician: Demarco, the brooding judge with a dark past he can no longer hide

Where Dreams Descend is the startling and romantic first book in Janella Angeles’ debut Kingdom of Cards fantasy duology where magic is both celebrated and feared, and no heart is left unscathed.

Review:

Kallia is the star showgirl at a secret nightclub, but no one knows what she looks like hidden behind her mask. When she escapes to the city Glorian, she enters a competition for magicians. She is the only female magician in the competition. Kallia catches the eye of Demarco, a retired magician with a dark past who is judging the competition. Things spin out of control when contestants go missing and everyone gets closed down in the city.

The magic in this world was different from typical fantasy novels. The magicians were born with their talent, which was a performative magic with illusions and transformations. Some had more skill than others, but the magic would wear out the magician after the performance. This kind of magic seemed more real, because it reminded me of watching magicians or illusionists perform on a stage or on TV, rather than the fantastic magic in other fantasy novels.

This story was exciting and unpredictable. The competition was largely a mystery to the magicians, with their props given to them right as they had to perform. They couldn’t prepare for the act ahead of time, so the performances were a surprise for the judges and the reader. There were some hints about the characters’ mysterious pasts given throughout the story. I still had some questions at the end of the story, so I’m looking forward to learning the rest in the next book.

This is a great, magical story!

Thank you Wednesday Books for providing a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

What to read next:

Caraval (Caraval #1) Stephanie Garber

Ace of Shades (The Shadow Game #1) by Amanda

About the author:

JANELLA ANGELES is a Filipino-American author who got her start in writing through consuming glorious amounts of fanfiction at a young age—which eventually led to penning a few of her own, and later on, creating original stories from her imagination. A lifelong lover of books, she’s lucky enough to be working in the business of publishing them on top of writing them. She currently resides in Massachusetts, where she’s most likely to be found listening to musicals on repeat and daydreaming too much for her own good. Where Dreams Descend is her first book.

Have you read Where Dreams Descend? What did you think of it?

Review: Ever Cursed

Title: Ever Cursed
Author: Corey Ann Haydu
Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy
Publisher: Simon and Schuster Canada
Source: Publisher via NetGalley
Format: Ebook
Release Date: July 28, 2020
Rating: ★★★★★

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Goodreads Synopsis:

Damsel meets A Heart in a Body in the World in this incisive and lyrical feminist fairy tale about a princess determined to save her sisters from a curse, even if it means allying herself with the very witch who cast it.

The Princesses of Ever are beloved by the kingdom and their father, the King. They are cherished, admired.

Cursed.

Jane, Alice, Nora, Grace, and Eden carry the burden of being punished for a crime they did not commit, or even know about. They are each cursed to be Without one essential thing—the ability to eat, sleep, love, remember, or hope. And their mother, the Queen, is imprisoned, frozen in time in an unbreakable glass box.

But when Eden’s curse sets in on her thirteenth birthday, the princesses are given the opportunity to break the curse, preventing it from becoming a True Spell and dooming the princesses for life. To do this, they must confront the one who cast the spell—Reagan, a young witch who might not be the villain they thought—as well as the wickedness plaguing their own kingdom…and family.

Told through the eyes of Reagan and Jane—the witch and the bewitched—this insightful twist of a fairy tale explores power in a patriarchal kingdom not unlike our own.

Review:

The princesses of Ever were cursed on their thirteenth birthdays. Just before the oldest princess’s thirteenth birthday, a young witch, Reagan, visited them, cursed the five princesses, and enclosed their mother in a glass box. On each of their thirteenth birthdays they would be cursed, each girl losing the ability to eat, to sleep, to love, to remember, or to hope. The princesses will have just a few days to break the curse after the youngest princess turns thirteen and before the witch turns eighteen, which will make the curses last forever. The eldest princess, Jane, who has lost the ability to eat, has to look after her sisters and figure out how to break the curse, while also learning why they were cursed in the first place.

This story was set in a fairytale-like kingdom called Ever, but the serious subject matter wasn’t like a children’s fairytale. The Kingdom looked picturesque from the outside, but their history was filled with sexual assaults and rape. These things were hinted at through the beginning of the book, and weren’t confirmed until partway through, but I think it was obvious that that was what happened. These serious issues reminded me of the dark subject matter of the original Grimm’s fairytales, which were disturbing and not always meant for children.

I was hopeful for the princesses throughout the story, though they kept having bad things happen to them. It was getting so bad that I didn’t see how it could possibly have a happy ending. I won’t spoil the ending, but I think it was fitting for the story.

This is a great fairytale fantasy with contemporary themes.

Thank you Simon and Schuster Canada for providing a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

What to read next:

The Wicked Deep by Shea Ernshaw

Cinderella is Dead by Kalynn Bayron

Have you read Ever Cursed? What did you think of it?

Review: Two Dark Reigns (Three Dark Crowns #3)

Title: Two Dark Reigns (Three Dark Crowns #3)
Author: Kendare Blake
Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy
Publisher: HarperTeen
Source: Purchased
Format: Hardcover
Release Date: September 4, 2018
Rating: ★★★★★

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Goodreads Synopsis:

#1 New York Times bestselling author Kendare Blake returns with the highly anticipated third book in the Three Dark Crowns series! And while Arsinoe, Mirabella, and Katharine all have their own scores to settle, they aren’t the only queens stirring things up on Fennbirn Island.

Queen Katharine has waited her entire life to wear the crown. But now that she finally has it, the murmurs of dissent grow louder by the day. There’s also the alarming issue of whether or not her sisters are actually dead—or if they’re waiting in the wings to usurp the throne.

Mirabella and Arsinoe are alive, but in hiding on the mainland and dealing with a nightmare of their own: being visited repeatedly by a specter they think might be the fabled Blue Queen. Though she says nothing, her rotting, bony finger pointing out to sea is clear enough: return to Fennbirn. 

Jules, too, is in a strange place—in disguise. And her only confidants, a war-gifted girl named Emilia and her oracle friend Mathilde, are urging her to take on a role she can’t imagine filling: a legion-cursed queen who will lead a rebel army to Katharine’s doorstep.

This is an uprising that the mysterious Blue Queen may have more to do with than anyone could have guessed—or expected.

Review:

Queen Katharine won the battle, so she is ruling Fennbirn Island. Her sisters, Arinsoe and Mirabella, are on the mainland, where they escaped after the duel with Katharine. Katharine doesn’t know if her sisters are alive or not, which means they could come and threaten her reign. Arsinoe’s friend Jules also escaped and is living in disguise. Jules’s friends Emilia and Mathilde want her to fill the role of the legion cursed queen to oppose Katharine. At the same time, the legendary Blue Queen is appearing in Arsinoe’s dreams, pointing her back toward Fennbirn Island. The biggest danger may be something they can’t see.

This story had a lot of world building, even though it is the third in the series. It opens with a flashback 400 years ago when Queen Illian, the Blue Queen, was born. She plays an important role in the story. I loved that history returned to the island in this story.

The plot took a twist I didn’t see coming. Some characters that were minor in previous books became more important to the story in this book. I love that the plot arc has changed in a surprising way, yet it still makes sense to the story as a whole.

I loved this book! I’m going to have to get the next book right away!

What to read next:

Five Dark Fates (Three Dark Crowns #3) by Kendare Blake

Queens of Fennbirn (Three Dark Crowns #0.1-0.2) by Kendare Blake

Other books in the series:

Have you read Two Dark Reigns? What did you think of it?

Review: The Guinevere Deception (Camelot Rising #1)

Title: The Guinevere Deception (Camelot Rising #1)
Author: Kiersten White
Genre: Young Adult, Historical Fiction, Fantasy
Publisher: Delacorte Press
Source: Owlcrate
Format: Hardcover
Release Date: November 5, 2019
Rating: ★★★★★

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Goodreads Synopsis:

From New York Times bestselling author Kiersten White comes a new fantasy series reimagining the Arthurian legend, set in the magical world of Camelot. 

There was nothing in the world as magical and terrifying as a girl.

Princess Guinevere has come to Camelot to wed a stranger: the charismatic King Arthur. With magic clawing at the kingdom’s borders, the great wizard Merlin conjured a solution–send in Guinevere to be Arthur’s wife . . . and his protector from those who want to see the young king’s idyllic city fail. The catch? Guinevere’s real name–and her true identity–is a secret. She is a changeling, a girl who has given up everything to protect Camelot. 

To keep Arthur safe, Guinevere must navigate a court in which the old–including Arthur’s own family–demand things continue as they have been, and the new–those drawn by the dream of Camelot–fight for a better way to live. And always, in the green hearts of forests and the black depths of lakes, magic lies in wait to reclaim the land. Arthur’s knights believe they are strong enough to face any threat, but Guinevere knows it will take more than swords to keep Camelot free.

Deadly jousts, duplicitous knights, and forbidden romances are nothing compared to the greatest threat of all: the girl with the long black hair, riding on horseback through the dark woods toward Arthur. Because when your whole existence is a lie, how can you trust even yourself?

Review:

Princess Guinevere has arrived in Camelot to marry King Arthur. However, she isn’t the real Guinevere. She is a changeling that took the princess’s place at Merlin’s request. Guinevere has been sent to Camelot to protect Arthur from an unknown magical threat. As Guinevere learns more about the kingdom and tries to figure out the mysterious threat to Arthur, she realizes she doesn’t know much about herself and the world around her. Guinevere has to learn more about herself to get to the truth of Camelot.

I read stories about King Arthur when I was a kid, but I had forgotten the details before reading this story. I googled the story when I started it, so I did get some minor spoilers for the story. There were some twists from the original tale that modernized it and made it original.

This is a great introduction to the series. There were many hints of things to come. Guinevere’s past is a mystery, which I’m hoping will be explored in the next book. I had a lot of questions at the end, but these made me interested in the next book.

I really enjoyed this story!

What to read next:

Thorn by Intisar Khanani

And I Darken by Kiersten White

Have you read The Guinevere Deception? What did you think of it?