Review: The Radical Element


Title: The Radical Element
Author: Jessica Spotswood (editor)
Genre: Young Adult, Short Stories
Publisher: Candlewick Press
Source: NetGalley
Release Date: March 13, 2018
Rating: ★★★★


Goodreads Synopsis:

In an anthology of revolution and resistance, a sisterhood of YA writers shines a light on a century and a half of heroines on the margins and in the intersections.

To respect yourself, to love yourself—should not have to be a radical decision. And yet it remains as challenging for an American girl to make today as it was in 1927 on the steps of the Supreme Court. It’s a decision that must be faced whether you’re balancing on the tightrope of neurodivergence, finding your way as a second-generation immigrant, or facing down American racism even while loving America. And it’s the only decision when you’ve weighed society’s expectations and found them wanting. In The Radical Element, twelve of the most talented writers working in young adult literature today tell the stories of the girls of all colors and creeds standing up for themselves and their beliefs—whether that means secretly learning Hebrew in early Savannah, using the family magic to pass as white in 1920s Hollywood, or singing in a feminist punk band in 1980s Boston. And they’re asking you to join them.


This is a collection of stories that feature girls who live on the margins of society in some way, and rebel against the expectations of society.

I loved the tension and pacing in the stories. They often ended right as something was going to happen, which left me wanting more. I’m going to look up other works by these authors, because they were all great.

One thing that bothered me about these stories was the lack of geographical and racial diversity. The first half of the stories featured white main characters and were set in southern United States. The one main character who was Mexican used her magic to appear white to blend in with the other actresses in early twentieth century Hollywood. Each of the girls had some other way that they stood on the fringe of society, whether in ability, sexuality, or religion but I would have liked to see more races and settings in the stories. The latter half of the book featured more main characters who were women of colour, but I wish they appeared earlier in the book.

Review: A Road to Nowhere: A thriller short story


Title: A Road to Nowhere: A thriller short story
Author: Ted Galdi
Genre: Short Story, Thriller
Publisher: Precipice Books
Source: Author
Release Date: January 7, 2017
Rating: ★★★★


Goodreads Synopsis:

“Where nowhere is the only place to escape”

An empty highway at midnight in Montana. A serial killer on the loose. An abandoned girl who desperately needs a ride. A man in a pickup truck offering to help. The surprising consequences of her getting inside.

Do you like quick reads?

Do you like hold-your-breath suspense?

Do you like shocking endings?

Then you’ll love A Road to Nowhere, the first short story by Ted Galdi, an Amazon #1 bestselling author who’s won Reader Views and Readers’ Favorite awards, and been featured by FOX, ABC, and iHeartRadio. He’s the author of the novels Elixir, An American Cage, and Lion on Fire.


I really enjoyed Ted Galdi’s novel, An American Cage, so I was excited to read this short story.

This story was very good. A girl on the side of a deserted road gets into a truck with a strange man. The whole time I kept thinking she was making a big mistake. He was kind of creepy and she didn’t know him, so who knows what he could do.

I predicted what would happen at the end, but it was still good. It had a good twist for a seemingly predictable story. This is a great short thriller!

Review: Doctor Who: Myths and Legends


Title: Doctor Who: Myths and Legends
Author: Richard Dinnick
Genre: Short Stories, Science Fiction
Publisher: Penguin Random House UK
Source: NetGalley
Release Date: September 26, 2017
Rating: ★★★★

Goodreads Synopsis:

For thousands of years, epic stories have been passed down from Time Lord to student, generation to generation. The truth of these tales was lost millennia ago, but the myths and legends themselves are timeless.

These are the most enduring of those tales. From the princess Manussa and her giant snake Mara, to the Vardon Horse of Xeriphin, these stories shed light on the universe around us and the beings from other worlds that we meet. Myths hold up a mirror to our past, present and future, explaining our culture, our history, our hopes and fears.

A collection of epic adventures from the Time Lords’ mist-covered past, Myths and Legends is an unforgettable gallery of heroes and villains, gods and monsters.


I love Doctor Who, so I was super excited when I was approved for this galley on NetGalley!

This is a collection of myths and legends from the Doctor Who universe. The stories feature some of my favourite creatures, like the Cybermen and Daleks.

I loved how these stories are taken from real ancient myths and legends, using Doctor Who characters, such as “The Mondas Touch” based on The Midas Touch, and “The Vardon Horse” based on the story of the Trojan horse. I love Greek mythology so I appreciated the way that the Doctor Who universe was blended with these ancient stories.

Sometimes there was a grey haired man, who could travel in time, that appeared in the stories. I wish this appearance of the Doctor happened more often because it was funny to see the reactions of the other creatures to this strange man.

At times the stories were quite detailed and spoke about things that were scientific, so I kind of got lost. But otherwise I loved this book! It’s a great collection of Doctor Who stories.

Review: Pimp in the Pulpit

Title: Pimp in the Pulpit
Author: Thomas McRae
Genre: Short Story
Publisher: Eber and Wein Publishing
Source: Author
Release Date: December 2, 2016
Rating: ★★★


Well, this was quite a story! It’s about a family going through the daily struggles of life. They have a ninety-five year old grandmother who is having a birthday, but her children are fighting amongst themselves about money. Some siblings take the money and spend it on themselves rather than the party. Others are excluded from the party because they are not liked. Everyone seemed to be mad at each other for one reason or another.

The dysfunctional aspects of family life were represented very well in this story. Some of the swearing and arguments were so extreme, I had to laugh.

I wish the stories had been longer. It sounded like a summary of a story rather than the full thing. There were a lot of “he said she said” parts, so the actions were just told by someone else rather than actually happening in the story. These stories could have definitely been expanded into a full length novel, if the actions actually played out rather than being discussed by the characters.

A lot of the story was told in the present tense, which was unusual. It often jumped between tenses so I didn’t know when things were happening, in the past or present.

This story was a quick and entertaining read!